it took cojones to parent in the old days

Sure, some might say we grew up roughing it by today’s standards…but maybe we were the ones who actually gained in the end.  Is it possible, as the author says, that “we just don’t have the cojones our parents had”? 

“If you haven’t noticed, we’re getting a raw deal where this parenting gig is concerned.  When did adults start caring whether or not their kids were safe, happy or popular?  I can assure you that Ginny and Big Jerry were not wiling away the hours wondering if my brother and I were fulfilled.

Big Jerry was stoking the fires of his retirement savings and working, and working some more.  Ginny was double bolting the door in order to keep us out of the house, and talking on the phone while she smoked a Kent.  Meanwhile, we were three neighborhoods away, playing with some kids we’d never met, and we had crossed two major highways on bicycles with semi-flat tires to get there.  Odds are, one of us had crashed at some point and was bleeding pretty impressively.  No one cared.  We were kids and if we weren’t acting as free labor, we were supposed to be out of the house and out of the way.”

Are Today’s Parents Getting a Raw Deal? | The Huffington Post

parenting in the digital world

As we inch closer and closer to T-man’s 13th birthday – and since he’s begun to dip his toe into the Instagram world – I’ve been grateful to find resources with some parenting advice.  Something a little more concrete than buckle up and hold on tight.

“[After studying social media posts what] these researchers found was largely consistent with recent reports from the Pew Foundation, which suggested that most teenagers 13 to 17 were generally happy with their connected lives online, and believed that hanging out virtually strengthened their offline relationships.

‘Being 13’ provides an asterisk of sorts to that rosy outlook: These teenagers, at the youngest end of the spectrum, valued their online connectedness but also described in more detail the ways the specific online interactions affected them…social media had great power to affect their day-to-day emotions in ways a parent might regard with suspicion.  One child said she took 100 to 200 pictures of herself to get a good selfie; another regularly posted images on Instagram seeking specific forms of approval only to receive silence in return.  Many spent hours scrolling through the images of their peers’ lives online…

Here’s how to guide, help and monitor your child as she joins social media.”

Seven Ways Parents Can Help 13-Year-Olds Start Their Social Media Lives Right – The New York Times

three rounds on vaccines, autism, and Jenny McCarthy

Let’s get this out of the way right up front:  I’m a big believer in herd immunity.  Really big.  Huge.  A shout it from the mountaintops, hire a skywriter, put it on Broadway kind of believer.

I guess you could say I’m a fan.

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SoCS – genetics and the stink eye

Giving the stink eye is a long standing tradition in our family.  My mother could stop us dead in our tracks with a single look – in a crowded store, as we were leaving the park, when we showed our rear ends at a family gathering – one look from her and poof.  Problem eliminated.

Or it was if you were smart.  Being given more than one stink eye was a sure ticket to an unpleasant evening.

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Adulting is hard. CliffsNotes help.

We are not born with the genetic makeup containing life skills needed for success.  Humans require a decent amount of knowledge acquisition.  Here are just a few of the skills required for successful adulting.

“People think of learning as something that happens primarily in the classroom but our children learn how to “adult” by watching us, by being with us while we do our errands and by taking note of how we behave in any given situation.  When they go off to live their lives we wonder how they will figure everything out.  The following are thirty-three basic life skills that hundreds of parents agree young adults should have mastered by the time they leave us to lead their own lives.

1) They should know how to craft a handwritten note, place it in an envelope, address said envelope, stamp it and mail it.  And, while we are on the topic of mail, they should be able to pick up a package from the post office.  Tip: If you are mailing something oversized or heavy, it may need extra postage (let the nice mailperson at the post office weigh it).”

Here Are the 33 Life Skills Your Kid Needs to Know to “Adult” – Grown & Flown

how I’m killing it at this gig

It’s 11:00am, and I’m seriously considering making dinner tonight.

This is significant in a number of ways.  There are more days than I’d like to admit when putting an evening meal together just isn’t top of my list, and the times when I’ve made it a priority I’ve experienced what one might call a notable lack of positive reinforcement.  (Hello there, T-man and Bear.)

If I do manage to think about dinner, it’s usually a semi-panicky revelation right before BrightSide comes home.  As in oh crap, it’s 5:30, what on earth are the kids gonna eat?!

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Bella’s 6 step campaign for a TV

The never ending balancing act that comes with having more than one kid.

“Thus began Bella’s campaign for her own TV.  She started off slowly, asking Phaedra to turn up the volume on her TV so she could hear it from across the hall in her bed.  But when she started to disagree with Phaedra’s DVD choices, she started to get real.

I wish I had a TV in my room like Phaedra.”

The TV – 649.133: Girls, the Care and Maintenance Of.

mama moments 101

Are you concerned about flunking parenting?  That you’re scraping by with a C- simply by clothing and feeding your offspring?  Do you have the nagging feeling that you, and only you, are missing the genetic code explaining Garanimals, Lunchables, and Pokémon cards?

Fear not, brave reader.  You Are Not Alone.

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